Help Protecting Your ID

It seems like every day we hear about another data breach at some big company. Chances are you have had your information stolen. We live in a digital world and it is nearly impossible to completely remove all the risk of ID theft, but the following information can help reduce your risk of fraud:

  1. Check with your bank or credit union – they may offer an ID Protection Services for a nominal fee.

 

  1. Remove your name from pre-screened credit offers at optoutprescreen.com or call 1-888-567-8688.

 

  1. Add your telephone number(s) to the National Do Not Call Registry at donotcall.gov or call 1-888-382-1222.

 

  1. Remove your name from individual Direct Mail Association Member mailing lists at dmachoice.org.

 

  1. Place an alert on your credit file if you believe you have been affected by identity theft. Call 1-800-525-6285 or visit fraudalerts.equifax.com.

 

  1. In addition to contacting credit Bureaus, request a credit report and place a fraud alert at innovis.com. Click on the Personal Services tab to get a credit report and place an alert on your file.

 

  1. Request your free credit report through annualcreditreport.com or by calling 1-877-322-8228.

 

  1. Avoid carrying Social Security cards, birth certificates or passports and extra credit cards. If you carry a health care card and your Social Security number is used as your ID number, ask if it can be changed.

 

  1. Avoid using unsecured mailboxes. Promptly remove mail from your mailbox. Deposit outgoing mail containing personal information at your local post office. If you can’t pick up your mail, contact the U.S. Postal Service at 1-800-275-8777 or usps.gov to request a vacation hold.

 

  1. Shred your mail and important document when disposing of bank statements, credit cards bills, convenience checks, pre-approved credit offers, insurance statements and other documents that may contain personal information

 

  1. Select intricate passwords – don’t use information that is easily available like your birth date, your mother’s maiden name, phone number, or the last four digits of your Social Security number. Don’t store passwords in your phone or carry them in your purse or wallet.

 

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